Prepare Your Home Before Inspection

03.09.2016

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If you are planning to sell your home, there are plenty of things to do to prepare your property before listing it. Home staging is often the top of seller’s list of to do’s, along with updating features of your home, or refreshing your landscaping. There is also a home inspection to prepare for. I suggest taking some time before you list your home to review the most common red flags that come up in home inspections. If you do, you could save yourself a lot of money, time and stress when it comes to getting past the hurdle of a home inspection once you have an offer on the table. If you do find something that is less than satisfactory, it’s okay – you can still repair the item and provide an invoice for your prospective buyers to review. It’s always a good practice to repair some items, as buyers’ confidence increase (=offer price) when they see a seller takes pride of their home.

Listed below are some of the most common problems found during inspections, and how you can fix them.

Damp crawlspaces cause a lot of additional problems in homes. Often there is crawl space seepage, where water comes in from exterior walls through small cracks or poor grading, inadequate downspout and leaky pipes. If you house has a basement, seepage can also be a problem, where groundwater comes up into the floor and walls through small cracks that occur over time. If left untreated, the excess damp could cause water damage to wiring, floors or walls. The best way to combat a damp space is to have it waterproofed. There are contractors who offer this service and can provide an inspection with bid to seal your home up tight.

Do-it-yourself home improvements can be the cause of a lot of inspection issues. While it can be a great way to save some money, if you are not an experienced contractor, you run a higher risk of the workmanship not standing up to par over time. There is also a higher risk that something may not be completed within the housing regulations for home improvement projects. If you have completed some do-it-yourself projects, the best way to be sure they will pass a home inspection is to have a professional contractor review the project and advise if there are any issues.

Poor maintenance in general can be a big issue when it comes to home inspections. It is important to keep up on appliance maintenance in particular. Filters should be cleaned regularly, water heaters, heating and air systems should be serviced often. Keep all of your owner’s manuals for your appliances and note how often each should be serviced.

Roof repairs are another common issue that arises in home inspections. Leaky roofs can begin slowly and remain unnoticed for a long time. If left to continue, leaks can lead to great damage, especially when mold comes into the picture. The National Association of Home Builders recommends a roof inspection every 3-5 years. Be sure to get your roof inspected before you list, even if you had it done within the last couple of years. An up to date review will give you peace of mind.

Shoddy Wiring is found in a lot of home inspections. Poorly done electrical work is a major fire hazard. Any electrical component or wiring that is not properly installed is something that should be addressed right away. Have a licensed electrician review your panels, breakers and wiring to be sure that the system is working properly, especially if there has been recent work done in your home that included electrical components.

The best way to determine if your home has any of these common problems is to get a home inspection done yourself. Once you know what needs to be fixed to pass an inspection, you can face that part of the process with ease. When you are ready to sell or buy a home, we at Haylen Group are here to help you with all of your real estate needs! If you are unsure what your options are, call Helen Chong at (408) 800-LIST or email at Helen@HaylenGroup.com. You can also visit us at our website for available listings and additional information.

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